Math Teacher Workshops

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Workshop Discount

Substantial assistance is available for public school teachers (covering up to 80% of workshop fees). Contact Jim at jim.moser@principia.edu for more information.

Register Now

Join us for one or two workshops taught by math education author and consultant Henri Picciotto. These workshops are designed for middle school and high school math teachers and will be aligned with the Common Core State Standards both in content and in mathematical practices. Both workshops will take place at Principia Upper School, located at 13201 Clayton Road, St. Louis, Missouri, 63131.

 

Visual Algebra, 1.5 CEUs
July 25–27, 2016
9 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

In this three-day workshop, you will learn about a wealth of visual approaches to teaching algebra in grades 6–9, including the following:

  • Lab Gear manipulatives for basic symbol manipulation
  • geoboard lattices for slope
  • a powerful parallel axes representation for functions
  • intelligent use of technology

Participants will also learn techniques to help them better serve a diverse range of students by providing the following:

  • greater access by addressing multiple intelligences
  • greater challenge by expecting multidimensional understanding
  • greater variety by using manipulative and electronic tools

 

No Limits! (Algebra 2 through Precalculus), 1 CEU
July 28–29, 2016
9 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

This two-day workshop is designed for high school mathematics teachers who want to make Algebra 2, Trigonometry, and Precalculus more accessible, richer, and more fun. Participants will explore several activities designed to enrich and deepen the corresponding lessons in any textbook, whether traditional or reform, including these:

  • Concrete introductions to exponential, logarithmic, inverse variation, and trig functions
  • Functions from patterns; functions from geometry
  • Function diagrams: upper level applications
  • Iterating functions as a gateway to sequences, series, mathematical induction, and chaos
  • Geometry of the parabola (2D, 3D)

A frequent challenge in teaching upper level high school classes is the limited pedagogical range of most textbooks and curricula. This is particularly harmful to the students who find symbol manipulation difficult, but it is also cheating our stronger students out of the multifaceted understanding that would serve them best. To address this, several of the units presented in this workshop involve the intelligent use of electronic tools (particularly GeoGebra,) hands-on activities with concrete materials, and creative alternate representations.

Workshop Pricing

Register on or before May 8 for early-bird rates. Prices include breakfast, lunch, and snacks.

 

 Visual Algebra 

 No Limits! 

 Both Workshops 

 On or before May 8 

 $550

 $350

 $800

 After May 8

 $600

 $400

 $900

CEUs are available through the University of Southern California.

Discounts are available if registering more than 4 people from the same school or district.

You may cancel your registration by June 24 for a full refund. No refunds will be granted for cancellations received after June 24. Principia reserves the right to cancel a workshop if there is not a sufficient number of attendees. Any cancellation decision will be made prior to June 24, and full refunds will be given.

For questions, please contact Jim Moser at jim.moser@principia.edu.
 


 

Meet Your Instructor

Henri Picciotto is a math education author and consultant. He received his BA and MA in mathematics from the University of California, Berkeley and taught at every level—from counting to calculus—for 42 years. He is the inventor of the Lab Gear, a hands-on environment for algebra, and a leading authority on the use of manipulatives and geometric puzzles in secondary school. Picciotto has been an enthusiastic (and skeptical) user of electronic learning environments since the early days of the personal computer. He has presented hundreds of teacher workshops nationwide and shares his ideas about teaching and math curriculum on his Math Education Page. His cryptic crosswords appear in The Nation every week.